Depositional processes of late Quaternary sediments in the Yellow Sea: a review SCIE SCOPUS KCI

Cited 56 time in WEB OF SCIENCE Cited 55 time in Scopus
Title
Depositional processes of late Quaternary sediments in the Yellow Sea: a review
Author(s)
Chough, SK; Lee, HJ; Chun, SS; Shinn, YJ
KIOST Author(s)
Lee, Hee Jun(이희준)
Publication Year
2004-06
Abstract
This review focuses on the depositional processes of late Quaternary sediments in the eastern Yellow Sea, an epicontinental sea with a flat and broad seafloor (less than 100 m in water depth) and extensive tidal flats along the southeastern coast. The Yellow Sea was subaerially exposed during the last glacial period when sea level was about 120 m below the present level. During erosional retreat of shorefaces and river mouths, sedimentation was largely controlled by high-amplitude rise in sea level, forming transgressive sheets (echo type 1-3a) and sediment ridges (echo types 2-1 and 2-2) with extensive development of ravinement surfaces. The distribution of surface sediments reflects an interplay of sediment input from the surrounding landmass and the hydrodynamic regime in response to sea-level rise. Muddy sediments in the central part represent the Huanghe-River source and form a highstand sheet (echo type 1-3b). Large birdfoot-like sand bodies off the Jiangsu coast also represent highstand deposits when sea level reached the present position at about 6 ka. In the southeastern part of the Yellow Sea, sediments are dominated by sand ridges (echo types 2-1, 2-2 and 2-3), largely shaped by tidal currents. The southwestern corner of the Korean Peninsula is dominated by a thick deposit of mud, the Heuksan mud belt. The muds largely originate front the Geum River, whose distribution is controlled by strong southward coastal currents. In the coastal regions of the southeastern Yellow Sea, sedimentation is controlled by a combined effect of waves and tides with distinctive seasonalities in sedimentary facies owing to the monsoonal climate: tide-dominated mud deposition in summer and wave-dominated sand deposition/erosion in winter. Winter storms play a role in sedimentation on intertidal flats. Quantitative monitoring of sediment transport suggests that the textural variation results from the overwhelming role of winter waves superimposed on tidal currents in putting sands and resuspending muds. Due to low sedimentation rate, the tidal flats formed retrogradational, coarsening-upward pattern during the Holocene sea-level rise.
ISSN
1226-4806
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/5248
DOI
10.1007/BF02910197
Bibliographic Citation
GEOSCIENCES JOURNAL, v.8, no.2, pp.211 - 264, 2004
Publisher
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY KOREA
Subject
EAST-CHINA-SEA; WEST-COAST; LEVEL RISE; MACROTIDAL FLAT; TIDAL CURRENTS; SAND RIDGE; GOMSO BAY; TRANSGRESSIVE DEPOSITS; SUSPENDED SEDIMENT; NUMERICAL-MODEL
Keywords
Yellow Sea; Quaternary sediments; depositional processes; tidal flats; sediment transport
Type
Article
Language
English
Document Type
Review
Publisher
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY KOREA
Related Researcher
Research Interests

Marine Geology,Sediment Dynamics,해양지질,퇴적역학

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

qrcode

Items in ScienceWatch@KIOST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse