The genome of the giant Nomura's jellyfish sheds light on the early evolution of active predation SCIE SCOPUS

Cited 8 time in WEB OF SCIENCE Cited 9 time in Scopus
Title
The genome of the giant Nomura's jellyfish sheds light on the early evolution of active predation
Author(s)
Kim, Hak-Min; Weber, Jessica A.; Lee, Nayoung; Park, Seung Gu; Cho, Yun Sung; Bhak, Youngjune; Lee, Nayun; Jeon, Yeonsu; Jeon, Sungwon; Luria, Victor; Karger, Amir; Kirschner, Marc W.; Jo, Yejin; Woo, Seonock; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Chung, Oksung; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Yim, Hyung Soon; Lee, Jung Hyun; Edwards, Jeremy S.; Manica, Andrea; Bhak, Jong; Yum, Seungshic
KIOST Author(s)
Lee, Na Yun(이나윤)Jo, Yejin(조예진)Shin, Kyoungsoon(신경순)Yim, Hyung Soon(임형순)Lee, Jung Hyun(이정현)Yum, Seungshic(염승식)
Publication Year
2019-03
Abstract
BackgroundUnique among cnidarians, jellyfish have remarkable morphological and biochemical innovations that allow them to actively hunt in the water column and were some of the first animals to become free-swimming. The class Scyphozoa, or true jellyfish, are characterized by a predominant medusa life-stage consisting of a bell and venomous tentacles used for hunting and defense, as well as using pulsed jet propulsion for mobility. Here, we present the genome of the giant Nomura's jellyfish (Nemopilema nomurai) to understand the genetic basis of these key innovations.ResultsWe sequenced the genome and transcriptomes of the bell and tentacles of the giant Nomura's jellyfish as well as transcriptomes across tissues and developmental stages of the Sanderia malayensis jellyfish. Analyses of the Nemopilema and other cnidarian genomes revealed adaptations associated with swimming, marked by codon bias in muscle contraction and expansion of neurotransmitter genes, along with expanded Myosin type II family and venom domains, possibly contributing to jellyfish mobility and active predation. We also identified gene family expansions of Wnt and posterior Hox genes and discovered the important role of retinoic acid signaling in this ancient lineage of metazoans, which together may be related to the unique jellyfish body plan (medusa formation).ConclusionsTaken together, the Nemopilema jellyfish genome and transcriptomes genetically confirm their unique morphological and physiological traits, which may have contributed to the success of jellyfish as early multi-cellular predators.
ISSN
1741-7007
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/665
DOI
10.1186/s12915-019-0643-7
Bibliographic Citation
BMC BIOLOGY, v.17, 2019
Publisher
BMC
Keywords
Jellyfish mobility; Medusa structure formation; Scyphozoa; de novo genome assembly
Type
Article
Language
English
Document Type
Article
Publisher
BMC
Related Researcher
Research Interests

marine biotechnology,molecular microbiology,해양생명공학,분자미생물학

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