Phytoplankton biomass and primary production in the marginal ice zone of the northwestern Weddell Sea during austral summer SCIE SCOPUS

Cited 37 time in WEB OF SCIENCE Cited 0 time in Scopus
Title
Phytoplankton biomass and primary production in the marginal ice zone of the northwestern Weddell Sea during austral summer
Author(s)
Park, MG; Yang, SR; Kang, SH; Chung, KH; Shim, JH
Publication Year
1999-04
Abstract
During the austral summer of 1995, distributions of phytoplankton biomass (as chlorophyll a), primary production, and nutrient concentrations along two north-south transects in the marginal ice zone of the northwestern Weddell Sea were examined as part of the 8th Korean Antarctic Research Program. An extensive phytoplankton bloom, ranging from 1.6 to 11.2 mg m(-3) in surface chlorophyll a concentration, was encountered along the eastern transect and extended ca. 180 km north of the ice edge. The spatial extent of the bloom was closely related to the density field induced by the input of meltwater from the retreating sea ice. However, the extent (ca. 200 km) of the phytoplankton bloom along the western transect exceeded the meltwater-influenced zone (ca. 18 km). The extensive bloom along the western transect was more closely related to local hydrography than to the proximity of the ice edge and the resulting meltwater-induced stability of the upper water column. In addition, the marginal ice zone on the western transect was characterized by a deep, high phytoplankton biomass (up to 8 mg Chl a m(-3)) extending to 100-m depth, and the decreased nutrient concentration, which was probably caused by passive sinking from the upper euphotic zone and in situ growth. Despite the low bloom intensity relative to the marginal ice zone in both of the transects, mean primary productivity (2.6 g C m(-2) day(-1)) in shelf waters corresponding to the northern side of the western transect was as high as in the marginal ice zone (2.1 g C m(-2) day(-1)), and was 4.8 times greater than that in open waters, suggesting that shelf waters are as highly productive as the marginal ice zone. A comparison between the historical productivity data and our data also shows that the most productive regions in the Southern Ocean are shelf waters and the marginal ice zone, with emerging evidence of frontal regions as another major productive site.
ISSN
0722-4060
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/6167
DOI
10.1007/s003000050360
Bibliographic Citation
POLAR BIOLOGY, v.21, no.4, pp.251 - 261, 1999
Publisher
SPRINGER VERLAG
Subject
ANTARCTIC PACK ICE; SCOTIA SEA; SOUTHERN-OCEAN; EDGE ZONE; ROSS SEA; STANDING CROP; DISTRIBUTIONS; AUTUMN; NUTRIENT; BACTERIOPLANKTON
Type
Article
Language
English
Document Type
Article
Publisher
SPRINGER VERLAG
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