Diatoms in the desert: Plankton community response to a mesoscale eddy in the subtropical North Pacific SCIE SCOPUS

Cited 86 time in WEB OF SCIENCE Cited 90 time in Scopus
Title
Diatoms in the desert: Plankton community response to a mesoscale eddy in the subtropical North Pacific
Author(s)
Brown, Susan L.; Landry, Michael R.; Selph, Karen E.; Yang, Eun Jin; Rii, Yoshimi M.; Bidigare, R. R.
Publication Year
2008-05
Abstract
As part of the E-Flux project, we documented spatial variability and temporal changes in plankton community structure in a cold-core cyclonic eddy in the lee of the Hawaiian Islands. Cyclone Opal spanned 200km in diameter, with sharply uplifted isopycnals (80-100m relative to surrounding waters) and a strongly expressed deep chlorophyll a maximum (DCM) in its central core region of 40 km diameter. Microscopic and flow cytometric analyses of samples from across the eddy revealed dramatic transitions in phytoplankton community structure, reflecting Opal's well-developed physical structure. Upper mixed-layer populations in the eddy resembled those outside the eddy and were dominated by picophytoplankton. In contrast, the DCM was composed of large chain-forming diatoms dominated by Chaetoceros and Rhizosolenia spp. Diatoms attained unprecedented levels of biomass (nearly 90 mu g Cl-1) in the center of the eddy, accounting for 85% of photosynthetic biomass. Protozoan grazers displayed two- to three-fold higher biomass levels in the eddy center as well. We also found a distinct and persistent layer of senescent diatom cells overlying healthy populations, often separated by less than 10 m, indicating that we were sampling a bloom in a state of decline. Time-series sampling over 8 days showed a successional shift in community structure within the central diatom bloom, from the unexpected large chain-forming species to smaller forms more typical of the subtropical North Pacific. The diatom bloom of Cyclone Opal was a unique, and possibly extreme, example of biological response to physical forcing in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and its detailed study may therefore help to improve our predictive understanding of environmental controls on plankton community structure. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0967-0645
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/4513
DOI
10.1016/j.dsr2.2008.02.012
Bibliographic Citation
DEEP-SEA RESEARCH PART II-TOPICAL STUDIES IN OCEANOGRAPHY, v.55, no.10-13, pp.1321 - 1333, 2008
Publisher
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Subject
MICROBIAL FOOD-WEB; EQUATORIAL PACIFIC; IRON ENRICHMENT; SURFACE WATERS; STATION ALOHA; CYCLONIC EDDIES; HAWAIIAN WATERS; BIOGENIC CARBON; COASTAL WATERS; VERTICAL FLUX
Keywords
plankton; subtropical North Pacific; eddy; community structure; diatoms
Type
Article
Language
English
Document Type
Article
Publisher
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
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