Nationwide monitoring of microplastics in bivalves from the coastal environment of Korea SCIE SCOPUS

Cited 4 time in WEB OF SCIENCE Cited 3 time in Scopus
Title
Nationwide monitoring of microplastics in bivalves from the coastal environment of Korea
Author(s)
Cho, You Na; Shim, Won Joon; Jang, Mi; Han, Gi Myung; Hong, Sang Hee
KIOST Author(s)
Cho, You Na(조유나)Shim, Won Joon(심원준)Jang, Mi(장미)Han, Gi Myung(한기명)Hong, Sang Hee(홍상희)
Alternative Author(s)
조유나; 심원준; 장미; 한기명; 홍상희
Publication Year
2021-02-01
Abstract
Bivalves are useful bioindicators of microplastic contamination in the marine environment for several reasons, such as extensive filter feeding activity, broad geographical distribution, and limited movement capability. This study conducted a nationwide monitoring of microplastic pollution along the Korean coasts using filter-feeding bivalves (including oyster, mussel, and Manila clam) as bioindicators to identify the national contamination level and characteristics of microplastics. Seawater sample was collected from the same sampling stations of oyster and mussel for comparison. Microplastics were widely distributed in both coastal bivalves and waters with mean concentrations of 0.33 +/- 0.23 n/g (1.21 +/- 0.68 n/individual) in oyster/mussel, 0.43 +/- 0.32 n/g (2.19 +/- 1.20 n/individual) in Manila clam, and 1400 +/- 560 n/m3 in seawater. Despite the lack of significant relationship in the abundance of microplastics, their dominant features such as size, shape, color and polymer type were similar between bivalves and seawater. Fragments (69% for oyster/mussel, 72% for Manila clam, and 77% for seawater), particles smaller than 300 mm (96% for oyster/mussel, 83% for Manila clam, and 84% for seawater) and colorless (79% for oyster/mussel, 85% for Manila clam, 75% for seawater) were the dominant shape, size and color, respectively. The major polymer types were polypropylene, polyethylene, and polyester. The microplastic level in bivalves was relatively high in urbanized areas with a wide diversity of polymer types compared with those in non-urbanized areas, and the proportion of polystyrene in the Korean samples was abundant compared with other regions due to wide use of polystyrene products in Korea. Our result suggests that microplastic contamination is widespread in the Korean coastal environment, and bivalves can reflect the microplastic pollution characteristics of the surrounding waters where they live. (C) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0269-7491
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/41344
DOI
10.1016/j.envpol.2020.116175
Bibliographic Citation
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION, v.270, 2021
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Subject
MUSSELS MYTILUS-EDULIS; MU-M; MARINE; CONTAMINATION; ABUNDANCE; WILD; ACCUMULATION; ZOOPLANKTON; INGESTION; WATER
Keywords
Microplastic; Biomonitoring; Coastal environment; Bioindicator; Bivalve; Seawater
Type
Article
Language
English
Document Type
Article
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCI LTD
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