BIO-CONTROL OF MICROCYSTIS AERUGINOSA BLOOM USING VARIOUS AQUATIC ORGANISMS BY DUAL STABLE ISOTOPE (C-13 AND N-15) TRACERS SCIE SCOPUS

Cited 0 time in WEB OF SCIENCE Cited 0 time in Scopus
Title
BIO-CONTROL OF MICROCYSTIS AERUGINOSA BLOOM USING VARIOUS AQUATIC ORGANISMS BY DUAL STABLE ISOTOPE (C-13 AND N-15) TRACERS
Author(s)
Kim, M. S.; Kwon, J. T.; Lee, Y.; Ha, S. Y.; Hong, S.; Yoon, S. H.; Shin, K. H.
KIOST Author(s)
Lee, Yeonjung(이연정)
Publication Year
2018
Abstract
The application of C-13 and N-15 labeled phytoplankton makes it possible to directly follow the pathway and transfer of food source (cyanobacteria) into consumers (aquatic organisms), in contrast to past studies where only changes in compositions of chlorophyll-alpha, clearity, and nutrients were taken as the evidence for these processes. To evaluate the effect of biocontrol by aquatic organisms (aquatic plants; Iris pseudoacorus, filter feeder bivalve; Sinanodonta arcaeformis, and Unio douglasiae, macroinvertebrate; Caridina denticulate, carnivore fish; Pseudobagrus fulvidraco, Odontobutis platycephala, planktivore fish; Pseudorasbora parv, and omnivore fish; Misgurmus anguillicaudatus) on large toxigenic cyanobacteria bloom (Microcystis aeruginosa) in the freshwater ecosystem, we conducted a biomanipulation test on in situ ponds using dual stable isotope tracers (C-13 and N-15). As a filter feeding bivalve, S. arcaeformis could incorporate more toxic cyanobacteria cells than U. douglasiae, demonstrating its larger detoxification capacity. Also, macroinvertebrate (C. denticulate) continuously assimilated to cyanobacteria species in combination with zooplankton and detritus, probably due to detoxification capacity. Indeed, the aquatic plants (I. pseudoacorus) seem to be nutrient uptakes in water column and inhibit to light attenuation, comparing to cyanobacteria species. As a primary consumer of phytoplankton, zooplankton (Copepoda) consumed to small and edible particles which is changed from inedible toxic filamentous cyanobacteria species through the grazing efficiency by aquatic organisms. However, various kinds of fishes hardly feed on toxic cyanobacteria directly. Our result suggests that the native species, like Sinanodonta sp. and C. denticulate, are very useful bio-control organisms on toxic cyanobacteria bloom rather than carnivore, omnivore and planktivore fish. Furthermore, if an aquatic plant that can not only remove nutrients but also provide habitats to aquatic organisms (zooplankton, bivalves and shrimps) is developed, it can help control toxic cyanobacteria blooms. Therefore, it is considered that the development and establishment of habitat of useful organisms is very necessary for water quality improvement. Our biomanipulation technique may provide a key tool for efficient management and restoration of eutrophied reservoirs.
ISSN
1589-1623
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/40346
DOI
10.15666/aeer/1602_931953
Bibliographic Citation
APPLIED ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, v.16, no.2, pp.931 - 953, 2018
Publisher
CORVINUS UNIV BUDAPEST
Subject
MUSSELS DREISSENA-POLYMORPHA; NONTOXIC CYANOBACTERIA; EUTROPHIC LAKE; ZEBRA MUSSELS; TOXIC CYANOBACTERIA; EURYTEMORA-AFFINIS; PLANKTON COMMUNITY; CHEMICAL DEFENSES; PHYTOPLANKTON; FISH
Keywords
bio-control; toxic cyanobacteria; Microcystis aeruginosa; stable isotope tracer; water management
Type
Article
Language
English
Document Type
Article
Publisher
CORVINUS UNIV BUDAPEST
Related Researcher
Research Interests

Marine biogeochemistry,Stable isotope ecology,해양생지화학,안정동위원소 생태학

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

qrcode

Items in ScienceWatch@KIOST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse