Evolutionary Mechanisms of Long-Term Genome Diversification Associated With Niche Partitioning in Marine Picocyanobacteria SCIE SCOPUS

Cited 3 time in WEB OF SCIENCE Cited 3 time in Scopus
Title
Evolutionary Mechanisms of Long-Term Genome Diversification Associated With Niche Partitioning in Marine Picocyanobacteria
Author(s)
Doré, Hugo; Farrant, Gregory K.; Guyet, Ulysse; Haguait, Julie; Humily, Florian; Ratin, Morgane; Pitt, Frances D.; Ostrowski, Martin; Six, Christophe; Brillet-Guéguen, Loraine; Hoebeke, Mark; Bisch, Antoine; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Corre, Erwan; Labadie, Karine; Wincker, Patrick; Choi, Dong Han; Noh, Jae Hoon; Eveillard, Damien; Scanlan, David J.; Partensky, Frédéric; Aury, Jean-Marc; Garczarek, Laurence
KIOST Author(s)
Choi, Dong Han(최동한)Noh, Jae Hoon(노재훈)
Publication Year
2020-09-15
Abstract
Marine picocyanobacteria of the generaProchlorococcusandSynechococcusare the most abundant photosynthetic organisms on Earth, an ecological success thought to be linked to the differential partitioning of distinct ecotypes into specific ecological niches. However, the underlying processes that governed the diversification of these microorganisms and the appearance of niche-related phenotypic traits are just starting to be elucidated. Here, by comparing 81 genomes, including 34 newSynechococcus, we explored the evolutionary processes that shaped the genomic diversity of picocyanobacteria. Time-calibration of a core-protein tree showed that gene gain/loss occurred at an unexpectedly low rate between the different lineages, with for instance 5.6 genes gained per million years (My) for the majorSynechococcuslineage (sub-cluster 5.1), among which only 0.71/My have been fixed in the long term. Gene content comparisons revealed a number of candidates involved in nutrient adaptation, a large proportion of which are located in genomic islands shared between either closely or more distantly related strains, as identified using an original network construction approach. Interestingly, strains representative of the different ecotypes co-occurring in phosphorus-depleted waters (Synechococcusclades III, WPC1, and sub-cluster 5.3) were shown to display different adaptation strategies to this limitation. In contrast, we found few genes potentially involved in adaptation to temperature when comparing cold and warm thermotypes. Indeed, comparison of core protein sequences highlighted variants specific to cold thermotypes, notably involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and the oxidative stress response, revealing that long-term adaptation to thermal niches relies on amino acid substitutions rather than on gene content variation. Altogether, this study not only deciphers the respective roles of gene gains/losses and sequence variation but also uncovers numerous gene candidates likely involved in niche partitioning of two key members of the marine phytoplankton.
ISSN
1664-302X
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/40244
DOI
10.3389/fmicb.2020.567431
Bibliographic Citation
FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY, v.11, 2020
Publisher
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
Subject
PHOSPHATE ACQUISITION GENES; SINGLE-CELL GENOMICS; PROCHLOROCOCCUS ECOTYPES; TAXONOMIC RESOLUTION; ESCHERICHIA-COLI; CLIMATE-CHANGE; SYNECHOCOCCUS; LIGHT; DIVERSITY; BACTERIAL
Keywords
marine cyanobacteria; Prochlorococcus; Synechococcus; comparative genomics; niche adaptation; amino-acid substitutions; genomic islands; evolution
Type
Article
Language
English
Document Type
Article
Publisher
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
Related Researcher
Research Interests

Phytoplankton ecology,Primary productivity modelling,Coral reef ecosystem study,식물플랑크톤 생태학,일차생산력 모델,산호초 생태계 연구

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