Environmental change on tidal flat induced by anthropogenic effect around west coast of Korean Peninsula

Title
Environmental change on tidal flat induced by anthropogenic effect around west coast of Korean Peninsula
Author(s)
이윤경; 최종국; 유주형; 엄진아
KIOST Author(s)
Choi, Jong Kuk(최종국)Ryu, Joo Hyung(유주형)
Publication Year
2014-04-29
Abstract
Tidal flats are valuable ecosystem by a productive flora and fauna which support large populations of birds, form nursery and feeding areas for coastal fisheries, provide intrinsic values such as aesthetics and education (Costanza et al., 1997 Goodwin et al., 2001). The half of the world’s coastal wetlands will submerge during this century in response to sea level rise although salt marsh has a capacity to adjust to sea level rise change. However, tidal flats have been changed because of several coastal construction projects that had not been considered sustainable over the last 30 years in Korean Peninsula. The total area of tidal flats decreased from approximately 2,800 km2 in 1990 to 2,393 km2 in 2005 due to the land reclamations and dredging in South Korea. Many researchers investigated topography, sedimentation changes and local hydrodynamics for this area in the early 1990s. However, they are limited to the temporal and spatial scale because field surveys in the tidal flats are restricted due to the difficulties in accessing. The aim of this study was to examine environmental change in tidal flat in a large scale for long-term based on the remotely sensed data as well as in situ measurements. This study focused on the tidal flat that not only had been affected by reclamations on a large scale such as Ganghwa and Saemangeum but also had been indirectly affected by reclamations such as Hwang-do and Gomso-bay. 997 Goodwin et al., 2001). The half of the world’s coastal wetlands will submerge during this century in response to sea level rise although salt marsh has a capacity to adjust to sea level rise change. However, tidal flats have been changed because of several coastal construction projects that had not been considered sustainable over the last 30 years in Korean Peninsula. The total area of tidal flats decreased from approximately 2,800 km2 in 1990 to 2,393 km2 in 2005 due to the land reclamations and dredging in South Korea. Many researchers investigated topography, sedimentation changes and local hydrodynamics for this area in the early 1990s. However, they are limited to the temporal and spatial scale because field surveys in the tidal flats are restricted due to the difficulties in accessing. The aim of this study was to examine environmental change in tidal flat in a large scale for long-term based on the remotely sensed data as well as in situ measurements. This study focused on the tidal flat that not only had been affected by reclamations on a large scale such as Ganghwa and Saemangeum but also had been indirectly affected by reclamations such as Hwang-do and Gomso-bay.
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/26311
Bibliographic Citation
European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2014, pp.1, 2014
Publisher
EGU
Type
Conference
Language
English
Publisher
EGU
Related Researcher
Research Interests

Coastal Remote Sensing,RS based Marine Surveillance System,GOCI Series Operation,연안 원격탐사,원격탐사기반 해양감시,천리안해양관측위성 운영

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