Acid and Choking Ocean: Effects of Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia on Marine Benthic Animals

Title
Acid and Choking Ocean: Effects of Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia on Marine Benthic Animals
Author(s)
김태원
Publication Year
2014-10-01
Abstract
Ocean acidification is now regarded as one of the most threatening stressors on marine ecosystems. Because high CO2 event in the seawater is often accompanied by lowly dissolved oxygen (DO), the effect of ocean acidification should be studied in relation with low oxygen. Here I show the three case studies on the effect of ocean acidification and low oxygen on marine invertebrates: 1. Deep-sea hermit crabs, 2. Red abalone, and 3. Interaction between clams and crabs. First, low pH and low DO deteriorates the olfactory behavior of deep-sea hermit crabs (Pagurus tanneri) but increases the individual variation. It suggests that deep-sea acidification could impact hermit crabs but the population may able to adapt to future acidification. Second, to explore the possibility that coastal upwelling characterized by low pH and low DO influences the growth and mortality of red abalone (Haliotis rufescens), the population was intermittently exposed to low pH and low DO conditions. While low DO increased the mortality of abalone, low pH decreased the growth rate suggesting that DO and pH separately influence the physiology of red abalone. Finally, to determine if low pH and low DO events influence the interaction between manila clams (Venerupis philippinarum) and yellow shore crabs (Hemigrapsus oregonensis), a series of experiments were conducted. Only low pH and low DO decreased burrowing behavior of manila clams and thus increased in relation with low oxygen. Here I show the three case studies on the effect of ocean acidification and low oxygen on marine invertebrates: 1. Deep-sea hermit crabs, 2. Red abalone, and 3. Interaction between clams and crabs. First, low pH and low DO deteriorates the olfactory behavior of deep-sea hermit crabs (Pagurus tanneri) but increases the individual variation. It suggests that deep-sea acidification could impact hermit crabs but the population may able to adapt to future acidification. Second, to explore the possibility that coastal upwelling characterized by low pH and low DO influences the growth and mortality of red abalone (Haliotis rufescens), the population was intermittently exposed to low pH and low DO conditions. While low DO increased the mortality of abalone, low pH decreased the growth rate suggesting that DO and pH separately influence the physiology of red abalone. Finally, to determine if low pH and low DO events influence the interaction between manila clams (Venerupis philippinarum) and yellow shore crabs (Hemigrapsus oregonensis), a series of experiments were conducted. Only low pH and low DO decreased burrowing behavior of manila clams and thus increas
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/26010
Bibliographic Citation
Asian Marine Biology Symposium 2014, pp.58, 2014
Publisher
AMBS
Type
Conference
Language
English
Publisher
AMBS
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