Effects of climatic stressors on behavioral and physiological response of marine animals

Title
Effects of climatic stressors on behavioral and physiological response of marine animals
Author(s)
김태원; 이정아
Publication Year
2016-11-02
Abstract
Increased carbon dioxide emission increase temperature of not only atmosphere and but also seawater. Because of low dissolution of oxygen and increased biological activity, ocean warming entails deoxygenation or hypoxic problems in the seawater. We explored the combined effect of seawater warming and low dissolved oxygen (DO) on behavior and physiology of marine invertebrates such as Manila clams, Pacific abalone, and sea urchins. Under high temperature (23.5°C) and low DO (3mg/L) treatment, young Manila clams (Venerupis philippinarum) increased their emerging behavior and eventually had the highest mortality among different treatments. Interestingly, mortality under high temperature and high DO was higher than that under control temperature (20°C) and low DO. There was no significant difference in their oxygen consumption rates between treatments. In Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai), increased temperature (23°C) had a positive effect on foraging behavior but decreased oxygen had a negative effect. On the other hand, in adult sea urchins (Mesocentrotus nudus), there was no significant effect of temperature (22.5°C vs 18.5°C) and DO (6-7mg/L vs. 3.5 mg/L) on foraging and righting behavior. Given all these results, temperature and DO have differential effects on invertebrates and tolerance to these stressors are different depending on species.ater. We explored the combined effect of seawater warming and low dissolved oxygen (DO) on behavior and physiology of marine invertebrates such as Manila clams, Pacific abalone, and sea urchins. Under high temperature (23.5°C) and low DO (3mg/L) treatment, young Manila clams (Venerupis philippinarum) increased their emerging behavior and eventually had the highest mortality among different treatments. Interestingly, mortality under high temperature and high DO was higher than that under control temperature (20°C) and low DO. There was no significant difference in their oxygen consumption rates between treatments. In Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai), increased temperature (23°C) had a positive effect on foraging behavior but decreased oxygen had a negative effect. On the other hand, in adult sea urchins (Mesocentrotus nudus), there was no significant effect of temperature (22.5°C vs 18.5°C) and DO (6-7mg/L vs. 3.5 mg/L) on foraging and righting behavior. Given all these results, temperature and DO have differential effects on invertebrates and tolerance to these stressors are different depending on species.
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/24399
Bibliographic Citation
PICES 2016, pp.268, 2016
Publisher
PICES
Type
Conference
Language
English
Publisher
PICES
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