Active substances in antifouling paint released during ship’s hull cleaning using water jet spray

Title
Active substances in antifouling paint released during ship’s hull cleaning using water jet spray
Author(s)
Soon Zhi; 홍련; 송영경; 윤철호; 정지현; 강정훈; 김문구
KIOST Author(s)
Soon, Zhi Yang(Soon, Zhi Yang)Song, Young Kyoung(송영경)Jung, Jee Hyun(정지현)Kang, Jung Hoon(강정훈)Kim, Moonkoo(김문구)
Publication Year
2017-11-15
Abstract
Since the ban on the use of organotin-based antifouling paints, many other booster biocides have been emerged to replace organotin-based products. During the maintenance of ships on a dry dock, pressurized jet water is sprayed for clearing off foulants attached on the ship’s hulls. The sprayed water, which was released directly into the adjacent water column, was found to be heavily contaminated with paint particles and active substances released from the particles. Although some booster biocides are known to be easily degraded from the moment of release, they can be a source of hazard to marine organisms through continuous release from the paint particles into the environment. Paint particles accumulated in the bottom sediment also can be a continuous source of biocides and other active substances. This study is to characterize the compounds being released into the seawater through the spraying of pressurized jet water. Samples (jet water effluent, fouling organisms, paint chips, and adjacent seawater) were collected for metal and biocide analyses during ships’ hull cleaning on a dry dock. Metal concentrations were determined using ICP/MS and the distribution of biocides was screened using LC Q-TOFMS. Particle size distribution was also characterized using wet sieving and laser scattering particle size analyzer. The results will give insights of compounds distributions under different particle sizes and their relaoff foulants attached on the ship’s hulls. The sprayed water, which was released directly into the adjacent water column, was found to be heavily contaminated with paint particles and active substances released from the particles. Although some booster biocides are known to be easily degraded from the moment of release, they can be a source of hazard to marine organisms through continuous release from the paint particles into the environment. Paint particles accumulated in the bottom sediment also can be a continuous source of biocides and other active substances. This study is to characterize the compounds being released into the seawater through the spraying of pressurized jet water. Samples (jet water effluent, fouling organisms, paint chips, and adjacent seawater) were collected for metal and biocide analyses during ships’ hull cleaning on a dry dock. Metal concentrations were determined using ICP/MS and the distribution of biocides was screened using LC Q-TOFMS. Particle size distribution was also characterized using wet sieving and laser scattering particle size analyzer. The results will give insights of compounds distributions under different particle sizes and their rela
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/23574
Bibliographic Citation
SETAC North America 38th Annual Meeting, pp.336 - 337, 2017
Publisher
Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Type
Conference
Language
English
Publisher
Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Related Researcher
Research Interests

Biological oceanography,Zooplankton ecology,Introduction and dispersion of foreign species,생물해양학,동물플랑크톤 생리,생태,외래종 유입,확산

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