Tracing the Origin of Pb using Stable Pb Isotopes in Surface Sediments along the Korean Yellow Sea Coast SCIE SCOPUS KCI

Cited 3 time in WEB OF SCIENCE Cited 3 time in Scopus
Title
Tracing the Origin of Pb using Stable Pb Isotopes in Surface Sediments along the Korean Yellow Sea Coast
Author(s)
Park, Jong-Kyu; Choi, Man-Sik; Song, Yunho; Lim, Dhong-Il
KIOST Author(s)
Lim, Dhong Il(임동일)
Publication Year
2017-06
Abstract
To investigate the factors controlling lead (Pb) concentration and identify the sources of Pb in Yellow Sea sediments along the Korean coast, the concentration of Pb and Pb isotopes in 87 surface and 6 core sediment samples were analyzed. The 1 M HCl leached Pb concentrations had a similar geographic distribution to those of fine-grained sediments, while the distribution of residual Pb concentrations resembled that of coarse-grained sediments. Leached Pb was presumed to be associated with manganese (Mn) oxide and iron (Fe) oxy/hydroxide, while residual Pb was associated with potassium (K)-feldspar, based on good linear relationships between the leached Pb and the Fe/Mn concentrations, and the residual Pb and K concentrations. Based on a ratio-ratio plot with three isotopes (207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb) and the geographic location of each sediment, sediments were categorized into two groups of samples as group1 and group2. Group 1 sediments, which were distributed in Gyeonggi Bay and offshore (north of 36.5 degrees N), were determined to be a mixture of anthropogenic and natural Pb originating from the Han River, based on a 208Pb/206Pb against a Cs/Pbleached mixing plot of core and surface sediments. Group 2 sediments, which were distributed in the south of 36.5 degrees N, also showed a two endmembers mixing relationship between materials from the Geum River and offshore materials, which had very different Pb concentrations and isotope ratios. Based on the isotopes and their concentrations in core and surface sediments, this mixing relationship was interpreted as materials from two geographically different origins being mixed, rather than anthropogenic or natural mixing of materials with the same origin. Therefore, the relative percentage of materials supplied from the Geum River was calculated using a two endmembers mixing model and estimated to be as much as about 50% at 35 degrees N. The spatial distribution of materials derived from the Geum River represented that of fine-grained sediments originating from the Geum River. It was concluded that Pb isotopes in sediments could be used as a tracer in studies of the origin of fine-grained sediments along the Korean Yellow Sea coast.
ISSN
1738-5261
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/1221
DOI
10.1007/s12601-017-0020-9
Bibliographic Citation
OCEAN SCIENCE JOURNAL, v.52, no.2, pp.177 - 192, 2017
Publisher
KOREA OCEAN RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT INST
Subject
EAST CHINA SEA; FINE-GRAINED SEDIMENTS; SHELF MUD DEPOSIT; HEAVY-METALS; WEST-COAST; PROVENANCE DISCRIMINATION; ATMOSPHERIC LEAD; SAEMANGEUM DYKE; RIVER SEDIMENT; CLAY-MINERALS
Keywords
Pb; sediments; Pb isotopes; the Yellow Sea
Type
Article
Language
English
Document Type
Article
Publisher
KOREA OCEAN RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT INST
Related Researcher
Research Interests

Marine Geochemistry,Paleoceanography,Marine Pollution,해양지화학,고해양학,해양오염학

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