EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE (EPS) BUOY AS A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF HEXABROMOCYCLODODECANES (HBCDS) IN THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT

Title
EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE (EPS) BUOY AS A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF HEXABROMOCYCLODODECANES (HBCDS) IN THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT
Author(s)
홍상희; 장미; MANVIRI; 한기명; 송영경; 심원준
KIOST Author(s)
Hong, Sang Hee(홍상희)Jang, Mi(장미)Han, Gi Myung(한기명)Song, Young Kyoung(송영경)Shim, Won Joon(심원준)
Publication Year
2013-08-29
Abstract
Flame retardant chemicals are added to many consumer products in order to reduce the risk of fire. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant (BRF) used primarily in extruded and expanded polystyrene for thermal insulation in the building industry, with secondary applications in upholstered furniture, car cushions, packaging material and electrical household equipment1. The commercial product of HBCD consists mainly of three diastereomers: α-, β-, and γ-HBCD, with the gamma-isomer predominating in the mixture. Similar to polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), HBCDs are additives in BFRs and are not covalently bonded to the material. Therefore, they easily leach from the product during its use or disposal and are released into the environment. HBCD has been detected in various environmental matrixes and in biota. Since they exhibit typical POP properties (i.e., persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity), a global ban on HBCDs is currently being considering under the framework of Stockholm Convention on POPs. HBCD is third most used BFRs in South Korea. Its annual production volumes are estimated to be 2,173 ton2.In our previous study, we found the enrichment of HBCD in sediment near oyster farms in a semi-enclosed bay in the southern part of South Korea (the data is not shown here), where are not located near known sources of HBCD such as industrial facilities, sewage treatment plants or denn in the building industry, with secondary applications in upholstered furniture, car cushions, packaging material and electrical household equipment1. The commercial product of HBCD consists mainly of three diastereomers: α-, β-, and γ-HBCD, with the gamma-isomer predominating in the mixture. Similar to polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), HBCDs are additives in BFRs and are not covalently bonded to the material. Therefore, they easily leach from the product during its use or disposal and are released into the environment. HBCD has been detected in various environmental matrixes and in biota. Since they exhibit typical POP properties (i.e., persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity), a global ban on HBCDs is currently being considering under the framework of Stockholm Convention on POPs. HBCD is third most used BFRs in South Korea. Its annual production volumes are estimated to be 2,173 ton2.In our previous study, we found the enrichment of HBCD in sediment near oyster farms in a semi-enclosed bay in the southern part of South Korea (the data is not shown here), where are not located near known sources of HBCD such as industrial facilities, sewage treatment plants or den
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/26815
Bibliographic Citation
The 33rd International Symposium on Halogenated Persistent Organic Pollutants-Dioxin 2013, pp.1 - 4, 2013
Publisher
International Dioxin Symposia Korea Chapter
Type
Conference
Language
English
Publisher
International Dioxin Symposia Korea Chapter
Related Researcher
Research Interests

Microplastic pollution,Persistent Organic Pollutants,Oil Pollution,미세플라스틱 오염,잔류성 유기오염물질,유류오염

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