Producing fragmented micro- and nano-sized expanded polystyrene particles with an accelerated mechanical abrasion experiment

Title
Producing fragmented micro- and nano-sized expanded polystyrene particles with an accelerated mechanical abrasion experiment
Author(s)
심원준; 송영경; 홍상희; 장미; 한기명
KIOST Author(s)
Shim, Won Joon(심원준)Song, Young Kyoung(송영경)Hong, Sang Hee(홍상희)Jang, Mi(장미)Han, Gi Myung(한기명)
Publication Year
2014-06-18
Abstract
Microplastics are world widely found from beach to open ocean and from sea surface to deep-sea bed. They are manufactured as small plastic particles (primary microplastics) to produce resin pellets, scrubbers for cosmetics, or blasting materials or they are generated by the fragmentation of larger plastic products (secondary microplastics). Fragmented secondary microplastic particles account for the majority of microplastics and have various origins, which makes proper control difficult. Photo-oxidation and mechanical abrasion on beaches and (or) sea surface are thought to be major weathering and fragmentation process for generating secondary microplastic particles. None of scientific information is, however, available where and how secondary microplastics are produced. Fragmentation of expanded polystyrene (EPS), one of top three polymer types in marine debris monitoring study was done with an accelerated mechanical abrasion experiment in a laboratory. Forty EPS spherules detached from a EPS float were placed in an amber bottle with glass bead (3 mm in diameter) or natural sand (pre-combusted at 450 °C), respectively. The bottles were rotated with a tumbler for a month at 113 rpm. Fragmented EPS particles were extracted by density separation with deionized water and identified with microscopic FT-IR, SEM and fluorescence microscope after Nile Red staining. After mechanical abrasion, apparent surface damage of EPS srials or they are generated by the fragmentation of larger plastic products (secondary microplastics). Fragmented secondary microplastic particles account for the majority of microplastics and have various origins, which makes proper control difficult. Photo-oxidation and mechanical abrasion on beaches and (or) sea surface are thought to be major weathering and fragmentation process for generating secondary microplastic particles. None of scientific information is, however, available where and how secondary microplastics are produced. Fragmentation of expanded polystyrene (EPS), one of top three polymer types in marine debris monitoring study was done with an accelerated mechanical abrasion experiment in a laboratory. Forty EPS spherules detached from a EPS float were placed in an amber bottle with glass bead (3 mm in diameter) or natural sand (pre-combusted at 450 °C), respectively. The bottles were rotated with a tumbler for a month at 113 rpm. Fragmented EPS particles were extracted by density separation with deionized water and identified with microscopic FT-IR, SEM and fluorescence microscope after Nile Red staining. After mechanical abrasion, apparent surface damage of EPS s
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/26163
Bibliographic Citation
24th SETAC Euro Annual Meeting, pp.287, 2014
Publisher
SETAC
Type
Conference
Language
English
Publisher
SETAC
Related Researcher
Research Interests

Microplastic pollution,Persistent Organic Pollutants,Oil Pollution,미세플라스틱 오염,잔류성 유기오염물질,유류오염

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