Microplastic in Ocean: an emerging Issue of environmental concern

Title
Microplastic in Ocean: an emerging Issue of environmental concern
Author(s)
홍상희; 심원준; 한기명; 송영경; 장미
KIOST Author(s)
Hong, Sang Hee(홍상희)Shim, Won Joon(심원준)Han, Gi Myung(한기명)Jang, Mi(장미)
Publication Year
2016-12-30
Abstract
By virtue of high durability, light weight and cheap price, global plastic production has been increased considerable since the middle of 20th century. Mismanaged plastic waste could eventually enter the ocean via various routes such as creeks, rivers, wastewater treatment plant outfalls, etc.. It is estimated that 275 million metric tons of plastics waste was generated from 192 coastal countries in 2010, among which 4.8 to 12.7 million metric tons entered the ocean. The impact of large plastic debris (known as macroplastics) has long been the issue of marine pollution, while microplastic has only recently been recognized as an emerging environmental problem (Thompson et al., 2004). Plastic particles smaller than 5 mm in size are considered as microplastics, comprising primary (manufactured at microscopic size) and secondary (large plastics broken into small pieces) plastics. As large items fragment into microplastics, their abundance and bioavailability (ingestion by marine organism) increase. Microplastics have been found on the shore, sea surface, and seabed from the coast to open ocean. It is estimated that more than five trillion pieces of plastic are drifting on surface waters of world’s ocean. There is increasing field evidence of microplastic ingestion by a wide range of marine organisms including seabird, marine mammal, fish, and invertebrates. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that microplastics caneks, rivers, wastewater treatment plant outfalls, etc.. It is estimated that 275 million metric tons of plastics waste was generated from 192 coastal countries in 2010, among which 4.8 to 12.7 million metric tons entered the ocean. The impact of large plastic debris (known as macroplastics) has long been the issue of marine pollution, while microplastic has only recently been recognized as an emerging environmental problem (Thompson et al., 2004). Plastic particles smaller than 5 mm in size are considered as microplastics, comprising primary (manufactured at microscopic size) and secondary (large plastics broken into small pieces) plastics. As large items fragment into microplastics, their abundance and bioavailability (ingestion by marine organism) increase. Microplastics have been found on the shore, sea surface, and seabed from the coast to open ocean. It is estimated that more than five trillion pieces of plastic are drifting on surface waters of world’s ocean. There is increasing field evidence of microplastic ingestion by a wide range of marine organisms including seabird, marine mammal, fish, and invertebrates. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that microplastics can
URI
https://sciwatch.kiost.ac.kr/handle/2020.kiost/24233
Bibliographic Citation
KIOST International Seminar (KIS) 2016, pp.147, 2016
Publisher
한국해양과학기술원
Type
Conference
Language
English
Publisher
한국해양과학기술원
Related Researcher
Research Interests

Microplastic pollution,Persistent Organic Pollutants,Oil Pollution,미세플라스틱 오염,잔류성 유기오염물질,유류오염

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